World Perspectives

2019 Will Be Different

Just kidding.  Commodity prices are still going to go up and down. Donald Trump will still be sowing his unique brand of volatility. U.S. House Democrats will investigate, investigate, investigate. The media will repeat over and over that the sky is falling.   No kidding. The current partial shutdown of the U.S. government will end. The U.S. and China will reach some form of trade agreement, though it will not completely end the Thucydidean nature of the relationship. Unable to pass a Brexit plan, the UK will have to ponder a non-exit strategy. The U.S. Congress will just barely pass a North American trade deal. Modern food-making and distribution will come under new attacks over its efficacy.   Maybe. The U.S...

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From WPI Consulting

Communicating importance of value-added products

Facing increasing pressure to quantify the value of export promotion efforts to investors, a U.S. industry organization retained WPI to develop a quantitative model that better communicated the importance of exports. The resulting model concluded that value-added meat exports contributed $0.45 cents per bushel to the price of corn, increasing support for that sector’s financial support of WPI’s client. In addition to serving the red meat industry with this type of analysis, WPI has generated similar deliverables for the U.S. soybean and poultry/egg industries.

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